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Monday, July 12, 2010

On Suicide & Prevention

Been a while. Sorry, everyone. I'll try to be better at updating, but I tend to forget, and when I do remember, don't think I've anything of interest to write about. Karla argues since I've been around "forever," surely I can think of something. Maybe she's right. I enjoy blogging, even if most of my posts are off the top of my head.

But I don't want to talk about me or the other angels of death today. Instead, I want to talk about suicide. My wife, Delilah, killed herself, as did Karla's father. It's a subject that's often difficult to broach because people don't want to admit a loved one can be suicidal. They can't understand why the person "can't get over it." Not that I'm trying to simplify a serious situation. There are many factors concerning why someone kills him/herself. Sometimes the warning signs are there, but there are people who are able to keep their suicidal tendencies well-hidden, shocking everyone when they commit the act. I'm thinking of two other people I know who chose to take their own lives and yet seemed to be, for all intents and purposes, well-adjusted.

Please, if you're contemplating suicide, seek help immediately. Call a suicide prevention hot line, speak to your mental health doctor, call a trusted friend or family member. Get help.

Organizations such as Suicide.org not only provides information about suicide but suicide prevention phone numbers. The National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) also provides information and links to other sources. Of course, if you're sure you'll hurt yourself or someone else, call 911 or the emergency number wherever you live.

Just because I'm an angel of death, doesn't mean I, or my fellow angels, want to retrieve your soul before its time. I understand life may seem bleak and it often looks like there's no way out. I've been there. But a friend always tells me, "This, too, shall pass." No matter how dire a situation seems, it won't last forever.

Suicide, however, does.